The Women's Museum of Ireland
An online museum launched in March 2013, documenting the role played by women in Irish history, social history, media, politics and popular culture. The museum will eventually move into a pop-up physical space in the Spring.

irishphotoarchive:

Joan Denise Moriarty was a noted ballet dancer, choreographer and teacher of ballet. She received a V.A.T.S award (Variety Artistes Trust Society) in 1983. She was also noted as a traditional Irish dancer and musician.
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Our first famous lady is, of course, Mary O’Hara the lovely harpist on our logo! O’Hara achieved fame on both sides of the Atlantic in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Her recordings of that period influenced a generation of Irish female singers who credit O’Hara with influencing their style, among them Carmel Quinn, Mary Black, and Moya Brennan, among others. In his autobiography Memoirs of an Irish Troubadour (2002) Liam Clancy wrote how O’Hara’s music inspired and influenced him and others of the Folk Revival period.
irishphotoarchive:

Next is the eternally lovely Maureen Potter! An Irish singer, actor, comedian and performer in the 1950’s, she was born in the Dublin suburb of Fairview. Jimmy O’Dea, Ireland’s most popular comedian, discovered her when she was performing in local clubs and he placed her in one of his pantomimes when she was only 10.
irishphotoarchive:

Dana Rosemary Scallon was the first Irish performer to win Eurovision. She competed and won in 1970 and went on to become a politician. Well loved by the Irish people, her most famous song is “All Kinds of Everything” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awhQjT14cdA
intothebeautifulnew:

Maud Gonne, Irish actress & activist & muse of William Butler Yeats.  My guess is that this picture was taken in the late 1880’s or early 1890’s.  She and Yeats were both ardent spiritualists.
intothebeautifulnew:

Ninette de Valois, the Irish dancer who founded the Royal Ballet, in 1920.  She was known as she aged to be a ferocious director.
intothebeautifulnew:

Two Irish women in New York, 1910.
Women played a role in republican activity during The Troubles in Northern Ireland, 1970s
For a few short days in May 1798, the fate of the Rebellion lay in the hands of Mary Moore as she sought shelter for Lord Edward Fitzgerald. Mary was born around 1775-6, in Dublin, to ironmonger James Moore and his wife, who owned the Yellow Lion Inn on Thomas Street. Mary and her father were both members of the United Irishmen. Read more at womensmuseumofireland.ie